• Judicial Review in Federal Court
  • Residency Appeals
  • Sponsorship Appeals
  • Inadmissibility Appeal

If you have received an unfavorable decision on your immigration or citizenship matter, you may qualify for a judicial review of that decision. SP Law Office has significant experience in successfully handling judicial review leave applications. SP Law Office has successfully obtained positive results for its clients from the Federal Court. 

SP Law Office’s approach to handling a judicial review for your immigration application begins with a thorough examination of the decision-maker’s reasons to highlight the areas where the Decision Maker made an error of law, error of fact or delivered an unreasonable or unfair decision. SP Law Office will then put together the strongest arguments for the written Memorandum of Argument to be filed with the Court, identifying the issues involved in your case. Our strategy is to tactfully and persuasively articulate winning arguments that will capture the Court’s attention, depending both on supporting jurisprudence and legislation relevant to your case.

Our precise knowledge of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and constitutional issues pertaining to immigration and refugee matters, position us to frame the arguments of your case creatively and in a compelling manner. Using our experience and expertise, we help our clients navigate the complex procedures set out in the Federal Court Rules.

Please note that only a lawyer can represent you in the Federal Court of Canada.

In order to maintain your PR status, the law requires you to reside for 730 days in Canada in five years. There is a great deal of misunderstanding about the five years period. The period is preceding five years of an application you make for the renewal of a PR card or the travel document.

If you do not meet the residency obligation, the visa officer may refuse your application. The decision of the visa office denying the renewal of your PR card or travel document is appealable. This appeal is called a residency appeal.

The appeal may be based on law or humanitarian and compassionate grounds. If you have not met the residency obligation, you may still win your appeal. If you prove at the appeal that there are enough humanitarian and compassionate grounds to award you special relief, the appeal division can make an order to issue a new PR card or travel document.

There are two types of sponsorship: spousal sponsorship and parental sponsorship.

If your sponsorship application to sponsor your family member is refused, you can appeal the refusal. If your spousal sponsorship is refused, you can file an appeal. At the appeal, you have to prove that the marriage is genuine and was not entered into for the purpose of obtaining immigration status.

You can also appeal if your parental sponsorship is refused because you do not meet LICO (minimum income requirement) or for medical reasons.

If you are a Permanent Resident of Canada and have been charged with criminal Offences, always speak to the Immigration Lawyer. Certain convicts can render you inadmissible. Speak to the Immigration lawyer before you plead guilty to any criminal offence. 

If you become inadmissible for criminality, you can file an appeal to the Immigration Appeal Division.